Home Lifestyle “Study: Statin Therapy Beneficial for Elderly Over 85 in Reducing Heart Disease...

“Study: Statin Therapy Beneficial for Elderly Over 85 in Reducing Heart Disease and Mortality Risk”

77

A recent study has revealed promising findings regarding the efficacy of statin therapy in reducing the risk of heart disease and mortality among individuals aged 85 and above. The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Hong Kong, highlights the potential benefits of statins in preventing cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in elderly populations.

"Study: Statin Therapy Beneficial for Elderly Over 85 in Reducing Heart Disease and Mortality Risk"

Statins, well-known for their ability to lower cholesterol levels in the blood, have long been recognized as effective in decreasing the risk of CVDs. However, the use of statins for primary prevention in adults aged 75 and older has been a subject of limited consensus due to the lack of representation in randomized controlled trials.

Published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the study focused on adult patients over 60 without preexisting diagnosed CVDs, with an average follow-up period of 5.3 years. The results, based on a cohort of over 42,000 adults aged 75 to 84 and over 5,000 adults aged 85 and older, revealed a lower incidence of CVD and all-cause mortality among those who initiated statin therapy across all age groups.

Importantly, the study found that statin use did not increase the risk of adverse events such as myopathies and liver dysfunction, indicating the safety of statin therapy in elderly populations. However, the researchers acknowledged certain limitations, including unmeasured confounders such as lifestyle factors.

Overall, these findings underscore the potential of statin therapy as a valuable intervention for reducing heart disease and mortality risk, particularly among elderly individuals aged 85 and older. As the population ages, further research and clinical considerations are warranted to optimize cardiovascular health in aging populations.